2 years ago#1
Donald
Guest

I recently acquired an old coin op pool table and I have been unable to identify it. There is no name imprinted anywhere and the only number I can find is behind the coin mech door. The number is JJ 2286-4. I have attached pictures and would really appreciate any help given in identifying the brand and year made.

Answer
6 months ago#2
luv2video
Fresh Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 1
Votes: 0

It looks like an American Shuffleboard Co. pool table. I just got a pool table that looks exactly like it, except mine is missing the whole coin operating mechanism. This is where I can use a favor. Can you take several photos of that whole mechanism & email them to me so I can see what it looks like & how it works. That way I can search for the replacement parts. In appreciation for the favor, I can send you a copy of an original American Shuffleboard Company Product catalog. Thank you for your help.

Reply
6 months ago#3
Charly
Guest

I just got one like this too. I've been trying to figure out what brand it is. Do you know anywhere that I can find parts for it? I need the corners mainly, but eventually I am going to need rails and cloth too. Thanks! You just made my day.

Reply
5 months ago#4
Coin mech pictures
Guest

Sure, I can send you some pictures. Here are two I have already. A copy of the product catalog would be great. Thanks. Let me know what other shots you may need.

Reply
5 months ago#5
Charly
Guest

You two wouldn't happen to live in Florida, would you? I'd love to get together and try to come up with a source for parts.

My contact info is <email> if anyone wants to email me directly with some questions or could help me find some parts.

Have you had yours apart yet?

Reply
5 months ago#6
poolplayer1
Guest

Hi all, I have the same table...American shuffle board, made in New Jersey. FYI, if you are wanting to change the cloth, it's the same as any other table. If you need to change the rails you may not have to...just have the rubber on it replaced, or, if you have no choice, convert it to Valley pool table rails (apparently very close to the same). Not sure where to get parts otherwise. I hope this helps.

Reply
5 months ago#7
jade
Bronze Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 48
Votes: 0

Is it as easy as it sounds?

Reply
5 months ago#8
Charly
Guest

To take apart? Pretty simple. I'm just needing to find some chrome corners. All 4 are really bad. Anyone have a contact for parts like this?

Reply
5 months ago#9
Jose
Guest

I have the same table except missing the coin mech and side cover, I was wondering if you guys knew if the cue return was magnetic or not?

Reply
4 months ago#10
paparon
Fresh Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 5
Votes: 0

I have the same table. On mine the cue ball needs to be a bit bigger. There is an adjusting screw on the metal box inside the door where the balls collect. It diverts the slightly larger cue ball into another chute.

Reply
4 months ago#11
paparon
Fresh Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 5
Votes: 0

Charley,

I have the same table but I can't figure out how to take it apart. I removed the screws on the bottom but when I try to lift the side, the whole table lifts. I removed the rails & cushions but can't figure out how to remove the pieces to which the rails are attached. I need to have the metal corners refinished but can't figure out how to remove them. Can you help?

Thanks,
Ron

Reply
4 months ago#12
Jose
Guest

I was able to mess with the return with magnets but it doesnt really work might add a roll of magnetic strip to see if that helps since I dont like playing with the bigger cue ball.

Reply
4 months ago#13
paparon
Fresh Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 5
Votes: 0

Jose,
Good luck with the magnetic return mechanism. I don't know anything about that. In fact, I don't know much about pool and pool tables. My table was in the house I bought and it needs some work, particularly the metal corners.

Have you dismantled yours? It appears to me that mine has a one-piece slate which needs to be lifted up and out to allow access the the bolts holding the metal corners on. Is that right?

Thanks,

Ron

Reply
4 months ago#14
paparon
Fresh Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 5
Votes: 0

Donald,

My table has the serial number stamped in the wood underneath the table at the Coin Op door end. Mine is the same format of what you had written on the back of the door, so my guess is that that's your number.

Reply
4 months ago#15
Jose
Guest

Ron, no sorry I have not dismantled mines yet but I will have to soon to do a refelt and change the cushions but hopefully this will gave you an idea of some how to remove them http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwQvHCrNH4A

Reply
3 months ago#16
paparon
Fresh Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 5
Votes: 0

I finally dismantled my table. I took the ends off so I could remove the corner miters and have them re-chromed. A friend of mine is making a coin door and ball view door for me because mine were missing.

I removed the side trim pieces, I think they are aluminum and are just screwed on. This revealed screws which hold the cushions on. Removing them, I removed the cushions and was able to lift out the slate and lay it sideways on the table. I actually did this without help but very carefully.

The end pieces are held on by screws underneath and are screwed to the corner miters. Removing all the screws allowed me to remove the end pieces and corner miters. The end piece on the cue ball side is also supported by an extra brace screwed to the cross member upon which the slate rests.

It was pretty easy and everything else is pretty straightforward.

We found a perfect match piece of formica but had to buy the whole piece. If anyone needs a piece for doors, like I did, we are willing to sell the extra.

Good luck to the rest of you.

Ron

Reply
3 months ago#17
Shannon
Guest

I recently bought and refinished an American Shuffleboard table. The coin mechanism is missing and the rubber around the outside rails. Haven't had much luck finding parts. The table is solid and plays nice. The guy I purchased it from bought it used 35 years ago. I had fun working on it. My wife and I replaced the felt ourselves. I had a local shop do the bumpers though. Here's some pics.

Reply
1 month ago#18
Charly
Guest

I haven't checked the website in a while. Glad you got it all apart. The corners on mine were beyond help. I had them media blasted with the intention of powder coating them. They ended up with a lot of holes in them. I even tried to find someone to fabricate new ones but since they were stamped there was no way go make them exact. I decided that no matter how much I put into the rest of the table, the corners would never really look right. So, I decided to pass the table on to a guy who didn't really care about the corners. He just wanted something inexpensive to play on. I found a really nice Valley table that had been in a residence it's entire life. It had just been traded in on a 9 ft table. I got the whole thing with new balls, 4 house cues, 2 racks, and refelted in my choice of color for $1000. It seems like a lot, but when I started adding up what the other one was going to cost, it just made sense. And the most important feature of the valley table... Free Delivery!!! Lol

Reply
By entering this site you declare you read and agreed to its Terms, Rules & Privacy and you understand that your use of the site's content is made at your own risk and responsibility.
Copyright © 2006 - 2015 Pool Tables Buddies